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lewis. one of the ways i try to explain the students rosa parks made martin luther king possible the didn't make rosa parks possible. if she hadn't done what she did by refusing to give up her seat on that montgomery bus, martin luther king would have been an articulate, well meaning baptist minister. he opened up, she open the possibility for him to display the qualities that they had and to rise to the location. >> host: she also said as you know while she was sitting on the bus refusing to give up her seat she was thinking about the material of a new young black boy from chicago who went to mississippi and because he looked at a woman he was brutally murdered. do you think that his death changed or sparked anything in the civil rights movement? >> guest: a lot of things did. it was his death, it was the brown v. board of education decision. as people like barbara johns, the high school student that led a walkout of the segregated school because of protesting in the interior education. that's in 1951 we don't even know their names anymore even with rosa parks and montgomery. th
an articulate well meaning baptist minister. is because of rosa parks that we are talking about him today. he opened up -- she opened up the possibility for him to display those qualities that he had and to rise to the occasion. >> host: she also said as you well know that while she was sitting on the bus refusing to give seat she was thinking about emmett till, the young 14-year-old but what from chicago who went to mississippi in 1955 and because he looked at a white woman he was brutally murdered. do you think that changed or sparked anything in the civil rights movement? >> guest: a lot of things did. there was his death. there was the brown versus board of education decision. there was the killing of the civil rights workers. it was people like barbara jones, the young high school student who led a walkout of the segregated schools to protest against the inferior education. that's in 1951. many people we don't even know their names oregon before rosa parks in montgomery. there were two other teenagers who did the same thing. so this resistance largely among young people. >> host: always
, stokely carmichael? >> all of the above. i tried to explain to students rosa parks made more to mr. king possible. not vice versa. if she did not do what she had done margin mr. king would be inarticulate well-meaning baptist minister. because of rosa parks we talk about him today. she opened up the possibility to open those qualities to rise to the equation. >> host: while she refused to give up her seat she was thinking of the 14 year-old black boy from chicago who went to mississippi because he whistled at a white woman was brutally murdered. to that change your spark anything with the civil rights movement? >> his death, brown vs. board of education decision killing of civil-rights workers, the young high-school student who led a walkout to protest against fifth inferior education. 1951. many people we don't even know there names or other teenagers who did the same thing. so the resistance largely among young people. >> definitely when you talk about south africa, we all remember nelson mandela who was in a prison cell. for others to revived a movement in the early '70s and the late
, my. [laughter] kind of depends on the issue. rosa dehour rest is great on food safety issues. you know, this farm bill debacle, i have to say we haven't had a lot of support from anywhere, certainly not debbie stab now who i used to work with the group who helped elect her 20 years ago, very disappointing, the senator from michigan who we really thought was going to be able to stand up to some of these food companies. so, you know, i think it depends, and i think it's not a joke. people have to keep these elected officials, um, they have to keep them honest. and you have to have their constituency do it, you know? be so that's really what our organizing has to be focused on. >> time for one more. >> okay. >> what are your thoughts on cancer study, organic studies? >> you mean that organic food isn't worth anything and -- i mean, i think that's another study that the industry influenced and paid for. you know, that's the problem, research is for sale. so i don't think much of it. [laughter] thanks so much for coming, really appreciate it. [applause] >> we've known that hauter is th
pleased during the meeting to the cochair of our policy committee, congresswoman rosa delauro and congresswoman rob andrews. we have congressman johnson on your this well and the prevention tax force or violence. also mike thompson, thank you for your leadership. we are also joined by steny hoyer. with that, we will go to our cochairs. >> i think you very much, madam leader. chairman injuries, to everyone for scheduling this critical and very timely hearing. as the president indicated, there has been assigning of executive orders by the president and we all feel the urgency of responding to the dangers that are communities confront. with the distribution of guns and large capacity magazines and with the status of our mental health observations who ought not to have guns and make sure that we know who is getting weapons and bringing danger to our community. i appreciate the witnesses and i welcome them and it is obviously an extraordinarily timely hearing. the witnesses and the attendance in the media of the public. thank you for being here. thank you, madam leader. >> thank y
've written about this great deal, how dan has written about it, rosa has written about, simon johnson the great scholar, and others. that what is happening is the reason, one of the reasons we have not clicked as quickly as possible in recovering from the crisis is because the transmission mechanism for monetary policy is dumped out. think of it as sludge on the motor of age. it's very hard to get the pistons to move. we provide the fuel, central bank. it has to be transmitted into the economy. and when i don't have to and sent people to step on the accelerator, to create more jobs, that's a matter of having to write laws, right regulation, right tax incentives and so on. but it has to be transmitted through the banking system. and these banks that were in such deep trouble and controlled so much of the industry's assets have been focused on other things. so they are interfering with the effectiveness as i mentioned in my speech. if you can get people to understand that this is holding back and hurting job creation in our district, then i think you might have a little bit more politic
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6